ItchyFeetTraveler

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Washington, DC

Washington, DC Sites Photo Gallery - Washington, DC, the capital city of the United States, is a vacation destination for millions of people from all over the world. They come to visit the Smithsonian Museums, to see the monuments and memorials on the National Mall, to learn about the history behind these iconic structures, and to see the buildings that house the offices of our nation's government leaders. There is plenty to see and do in our Nation's Capital. This photo gallery includes some of the sites visited by most tourists.
2014 White House Spring Garden Tour - Twice each year in the spring and again in the fall, the gardens on the South Lawn of the White House are opened to the public. Tours require no advanced reservations and open to anyone with a timed ticket. These tickets can be obtains at the entry point of the tour. The self-guided tours can be completed in 30 minutes or two hours. Taking the tour is as close as most visitors will get to "The People's House." 
National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden - The Garden exhibits 17 modern and contemporary sculptures primarily by American artists. The shady 6.1 acre enclave provides a tranquil respite amid the hubbub of traffic between two busy streets along the National Mall. The lush plantings surrounding the art include perennials, shrubs and flowering trees. The garden is the ideal venue for lunch or the Friday evening Jazz in the Garden concert series. The central fountain, a piece of art in itself, provides a cool spray to ward off the summer heat and transforms into an ice rink in the winter.

Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden - Latvian born Joseph Hirshhorn passed through Ellis Island at the age of six. He dropped out high school at thirteen, made a small fortune just weeks before the 1929 stock market crash then went on to make a huge fortune in Canadian uranium mining. After collecting an eclectic mix of modern art during his lifetime, he donated his entire 6,000 piece collection to the Smithsonian Museum in the United States. The donut-shaped Hirshhorn Museum was built to house the collection. When he died in 1981, he left the Smithsonian another 6,000 pieces. The Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden, located on the National Mall just north of the Museum, displays sculptures by some of the best known national and international artists.
Anacostia Community Museum - The museum interprets the Black experience from the 1800s to the present in both in the United States and African communities around the world. Approximately 6,000 objects are on display including photographs, personal papers, books, audio and video clips, art works, archaeological materials, textiles, furniture, musical instruments, and clothing. Museum visitors can also learn about African American history and culture through film screenings, educational programs, workshops and lectures and, by appointment, peruse the museum library’s 5,000 volumes.

Franciscan Monastery - The Franciscan Monastery is set on 40 shady acres in northeast Washington, DC. The church and monastery, designated a National Historic Site in 1991, have been a place of worship and pilgrimage for thousands of visitors since the church’s dedication in 1899.  Replicas found in the church and catacombs and on the monastery grounds enable visitors to vicariously experience some of the biblical events we’ve learned about during our spiritual training.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial - The memorial's four outdoor rooms honor the accomplishments of the 32nd president of the United States. He was elected shortly after the Great Depression and presided during World War II. He is the only president to have been elected to four terms of office. South Dakota red granite cover the walls and floor of the memorial's 7 1/2 acres. 
Fitzgerald Tennis Center - The Fitzgerald Tennis Center is the home of the Citi Open (formerly the Legg Mason Tennis Classic), a place where, for about ten days each year, tennis fans can watch professional tennis players execute points with amazing artistry then on the very next point make the same boneheaded errors that we make on a regular basis. When this happens, many of us shake our heads and say “and they get paid to do that”.   Smithsonian 













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